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In the News

Listening to Icebergs’ Loud and Mournful Breakup Songs

April 05, 2017

In March 2000, the iceberg B-15 broke off from the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica. It was the largest iceberg ever documented, with a surface area of more than 4,200 square miles—more than twice the size of the state of Delaware. After it started breaking up, the largest of its pieces, B-15a, drifted along the coast of Antarctica, lingered on a shallow seamount, and collided with an ice tongue, before running aground and breaking again.

Link: Listening to Icebergs’ Loud and Mournful Breakup Songs

Underwater Volcano Footage Offers Rare Glimpse Of Submarine Eruption

December 20, 2016

The eruption of land-based volcanoes may be frequent. However, the same with a submarine volcano looks unique. More so about Axial Seamount — the active undersea volcano in the Northeast Pacific. In the latest eruption in April 2015, it triggered an average 200,000 earthquakes 300 miles off the coast of Oregon.

 

Link: Underwater Volcano Footage Offers Rare Glimpse Of Submarine Eruption

Mesmerizing Deep Ocean ‘Symphony’ Finally Identified

December 20, 2016

Scientists have been perplexed for years by a hypnotic, symphonic sound emanating from the deepest trench of the world’s oceans. Now they believe they have finally identified its source: elusive minke whales — but a type never before heard.

Link: Mesmerizing Deep Ocean ‘Symphony’ Finally Identified

Researchers unveil secrets of undersea volcano

December 15, 2016

Two decades of consistent monitoring lead to insights, forecasts. New research on the eruption of an underwater volcano 300 miles off the coast of Oregon may help provide insights not only into the workings of submarine volcanoes, but to their land-based cousins, which pose a greater threat to people.

Link: Researchers unveil secrets of undersea volcano

New, complex call recorded in Mariana Trench believed to be from baleen whale

December 14, 2016

A sound in the Mariana Trench notable for its complexity and wide frequency range likely represents the discovery of a new baleen whale call, according to the Oregon State University researchers who recorded and analyzed it. Scientists at OSU's Hatfield Marine Science Center named it the "Western Pacific Biotwang."

Link: New, complex call recorded in Mariana Trench believed to be from baleen whale

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