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In the News

Underwater Volcano Footage Offers Rare Glimpse Of Submarine Eruption

December 20, 2016

The eruption of land-based volcanoes may be frequent. However, the same with a submarine volcano looks unique. More so about Axial Seamount — the active undersea volcano in the Northeast Pacific. In the latest eruption in April 2015, it triggered an average 200,000 earthquakes 300 miles off the coast of Oregon.

 

Link: Underwater Volcano Footage Offers Rare Glimpse Of Submarine Eruption

Mesmerizing Deep Ocean ‘Symphony’ Finally Identified

December 20, 2016

Scientists have been perplexed for years by a hypnotic, symphonic sound emanating from the deepest trench of the world’s oceans. Now they believe they have finally identified its source: elusive minke whales — but a type never before heard.

Link: Mesmerizing Deep Ocean ‘Symphony’ Finally Identified

Researchers unveil secrets of undersea volcano

December 15, 2016

Two decades of consistent monitoring lead to insights, forecasts. New research on the eruption of an underwater volcano 300 miles off the coast of Oregon may help provide insights not only into the workings of submarine volcanoes, but to their land-based cousins, which pose a greater threat to people.

Link: Researchers unveil secrets of undersea volcano

New, complex call recorded in Mariana Trench believed to be from baleen whale

December 14, 2016

A sound in the Mariana Trench notable for its complexity and wide frequency range likely represents the discovery of a new baleen whale call, according to the Oregon State University researchers who recorded and analyzed it. Scientists at OSU's Hatfield Marine Science Center named it the "Western Pacific Biotwang."

Link: New, complex call recorded in Mariana Trench believed to be from baleen whale

New technologies – and a dash of whale poop – help scientists monitor whale health

October 04, 2016

 A lot of people think what Leigh Torres has done this summer and fall would qualify her for a spot on one of those “World’s Worst Jobs” lists. After all, the Oregon State University marine ecologist follows gray whales from a small inflatable boat in the rugged Pacific Ocean and waits for them to, well, poop. 

Link: New technologies – and a dash of whale poop – help scientists monitor whale health

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