National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
United States Department of Commerce

In the News

NOAA on Ocean Sounds

August 08, 2017

NOAA scientists record sound in the deepest part of the world’s ocean and discover a cacophony of sounds both natural and human generated. For three weeks, a titanium-encased hydrophone recorded ambient noise from the ocean floor at a depth of more than 36,000 feet, or 7 miles, in the Challenger Deep trough in the Mariana Trench near Micronesia.

Link: NOAA on Ocean Sounds

All Ears On Deck! A Gallery Of Noises From The Ocean Deep

May 18, 2017

We’re all about sound here at KLCC.  And so is the Ocean Acoustics Program at NOAA’s facility in Newport.  Its program manager, Bob Dziak  and his team of nine researchers, analyze underwater recordings which help gauge the health and activity of the waters.  KLCC’s Brian Bull visited Dziak recently as part of our ongoing 50th Anniversary Road Trip. 

Link: All Ears On Deck! A Gallery Of Noises From The Ocean Deep

Soundscape of the deep ocean

May 10, 2017

The Economist Radio: A new form of bioengineering ditches the cell and could speed up innovation. Five giant tech firms are hoarding most of the world's data. Is it time to break up the oligopoly? Also, an ambient soundscape from the deepest known part of the ocean (STARTS AT 13:10)

Link: Soundscape of the deep ocean

The Bloop: An Underwater Mystery That Took Nearly 20 Years to Solve

April 25, 2017

In 1997, while searching for underwater volcanoes off the coast of South America, scientists recorded something they couldn't explain: a strange, exceptionally loud noise. They called it "the bloop." The bloop was one of the loudest underwater sounds ever recorded: hydrophones (underwater microphones) more than three thousand miles apart all captured the same noise. 

Link: The Bloop: An Underwater Mystery That Took Nearly 20 Years to Solve

Listening to Icebergs’ Loud and Mournful Breakup Songs

April 05, 2017

In March 2000, the iceberg B-15 broke off from the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica. It was the largest iceberg ever documented, with a surface area of more than 4,200 square miles—more than twice the size of the state of Delaware. After it started breaking up, the largest of its pieces, B-15a, drifted along the coast of Antarctica, lingered on a shallow seamount, and collided with an ice tongue, before running aground and breaking again.

Link: Listening to Icebergs’ Loud and Mournful Breakup Songs

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