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In the News

Third Pod from the Sun: Eavesdropping on the Ocean

July 01, 2019

In this episode of AGU's podcast, Bob Dziak, head of NOAA PMEL’s acoustics program, describes the sounds scientists study with their underwater microphones, including the noises they’ve heard at the deepest part of the ocean in the Mariana Trench and a mysterious “bloop, and how they use that information to understand natural processes and the impact from human activities.

Link: Third Pod from the Sun: Eavesdropping on the Ocean

The 'roars' of Antarctica

April 04, 2019

Researchers from the University of Granada lead an international project to study two submarine volcanoes in Antarctica with great seismic activity. PMEL's Acoustic Program was part of the research deploying hydrophones in the Bransfield Strait. This article is in Spanish. 

Link: The 'roars' of Antarctica

Third Pod from the Sun: Gunslingers of the Sea

April 01, 2019

Third Pod from the Sun is the American Geophysical Union's podcast about the scientists and methods behind the science. In this episode, ocean acoustics specialist Joe Haxel describes the myriad of animals that contribute to Earth’s underwater soundscape, including fish that growl and crabs that scratch their backs. 

Link: Third Pod from the Sun: Gunslingers of the Sea

New data on seismology of underwater volcanoes of the Bransfield Strait in Antarctica

April 01, 2019

Scientists from the University of Granada (UGR) have managed to obtain images of the structure of two of the most important submarine volcanoes of the Bransfield Strait, in Antarctica, within the framework of the Spanish Antarctic Campaign 2018-2019, which has just ended. This work is in collaboration with NOAA PMEL's Acoustic Program. The story is originally in Spanish. 

Link: New data on seismology of underwater volcanoes of the Bransfield Strait in Antarctica

Greenland's Ice Melt Is in 'Overdrive,' With No Sign of Slowing

December 05, 2018

Melting on Greenland's ice sheet has gone into "overdrive," with meltwater runoff increasing 50 percent since the start of the industrial era and continuing to accelerate, new research shows. As more water runs off the ice sheet, it drives sea level rise, putting new pressure on coastal communities around the world. A publication Jim Overland and Muyin Wang co-authored is referenced. 

Link: Greenland's Ice Melt Is in 'Overdrive,' With No Sign of Slowing

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