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In the News

Greenland's Ice Melt Is in 'Overdrive,' With No Sign of Slowing

December 05, 2018

Melting on Greenland's ice sheet has gone into "overdrive," with meltwater runoff increasing 50 percent since the start of the industrial era and continuing to accelerate, new research shows. As more water runs off the ice sheet, it drives sea level rise, putting new pressure on coastal communities around the world. A publication Jim Overland and Muyin Wang co-authored is referenced. 

Link: Greenland's Ice Melt Is in 'Overdrive,' With No Sign of Slowing

Bubble hunters: Ocean scientists count 1,000 methane seeps off Pacific Northwest coast

August 31, 2018
Ocean researchers have found nearly 1,000 methane seep sites along the continental shelf of the Pacific Northwest. The bubble streams could be a sign of offshore energy potential, represent a greenhouse gas threat — or be neither of those things at all. Bob Dziak and Bob Embley are featured. 
Link: Bubble hunters: Ocean scientists count 1,000 methane seeps off Pacific Northwest coast

Audio Reveals Sizes of Methane Bubbles Rising from the Seafloor

August 06, 2018

Tiny bubbles of methane gas can be detected rising from the seafloor using sensitive underwater microphones and the sound data can be used to estimate the bubbles’ sizes.

Link: https://eos.org/articles/audio-reveals-sizes-of-methane-bubbles-rising-from-the-...

Sample science: Ocean explorers search for methane off the Oregon Coast

July 04, 2018

After three weeks of scanning and sampling for methane seeping out along the Cascadia Subduction Zone, researchers aboard the Nautilus pulled into the Port of Astoria on Friday with their findings. Tamara Baumberger and Bob Dziak are quoted. 

Link: Sample science: Ocean explorers search for methane off the Oregon Coast

Researchers listen to methane bubbles off Oregon coast

June 27, 2018

CORVALLIS, Ore. - A research team has successfully recorded the sound of methane bubbles from the seafloor off the Oregon coast using a hydrophone, opening the door to using acoustics to identify – and perhaps quantify – this important greenhouse gas in the ocean. Bob Dziak is quoted. 

Link: Researchers listen to methane bubbles off Oregon coast

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