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In the News

Hearing the under-sea whispers of a warming climate

July 13, 2020

Scientists are using hydrophones, instruments that use underwater microphones, to collect clues about melting glaciers and the songs of whales. Bob Dziak is quoted. 

Link: Hearing the under-sea whispers of a warming climate

Snapping Shrimp Pump Up the Volume in Warmer Water

March 10, 2020

For animals no longer than a stick of chewing gum, snapping shrimp make an impressive racket. En masse, they create what sounds like pervasive crackling, and the din gets even louder when the shrimp live in warmer water, new research has revealed. Bob Dziak is quoted. 

Link: Snapping Shrimp Pump Up the Volume in Warmer Water

Robotic gliders provide key tool to measure ocean sound levels

December 17, 2019

At a time when ocean noise is receiving increased global attention, researchers at Oregon State University and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have developed an effective method to use an underwater robotic glider to measure sound levels over broad areas of the ocean. Joe Haxel is quoted. 

Link: Robotic gliders provide key tool to measure ocean sound levels

'Sneaky’ underwater robot spent 18 days recording sea creatures — and noisy humans, too

December 07, 2019

For 18 days, an underwater robot dived and surfaced and dived and surfaced — some 402 times in all — listening to the ocean’s depths as it traveled hundreds of miles along the continental shelf off the Washington and Oregon coastline. Chris Meinig and Joe Haxel are featured. 

Link: 'Sneaky’ underwater robot spent 18 days recording sea creatures — and noisy humans, too

Third Pod from the Sun: Eavesdropping on the Ocean

July 01, 2019

In this episode of AGU's podcast, Bob Dziak, head of NOAA PMEL’s acoustics program, describes the sounds scientists study with their underwater microphones, including the noises they’ve heard at the deepest part of the ocean in the Mariana Trench and a mysterious “bloop, and how they use that information to understand natural processes and the impact from human activities.

Link: Third Pod from the Sun: Eavesdropping on the Ocean

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