National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
United States Department of Commerce

In the News

Historical data: Hidden in the past

September 22, 2017

In 2012, Ruth Thurstan turned to an unconventional source to study fishing: old newspapers. She wanted to know when people had started catching substantial numbers of snapper (Pagrus auratus), a fish species abundant off Australia's coast, and how much effort was needed at the time to catch them. But available detailed data stretched back only to the late 1980s. T

Link: Historical data: Hidden in the past

Alaska ferry to host long-distance ocean acidification study

September 15, 2017

The Alaska Marine Highway System ferry Columbia will be part of an international science experiment starting this fall when it resumes its weekly run between Bellingham, Wash., and Southeast Alaska.

Link: Alaska ferry to host long-distance ocean acidification study

Climate Change Is Not The Only Cause Of Greenland Ice Melt. Blame Sunnier Days.

June 28, 2017

Greenland’s ice sheet is melting faster than expected, and this has been accelerating over the past two decades. It is now the biggest single contributor to global sea level rise, accounting for 25 percent of the total. But besides warming climes, there is another culprit for the melt: sunnier days in fair Greenland.

Link: Climate Change Is Not The Only Cause Of Greenland Ice Melt. Blame Sunnier Days.

The Most Exciting Drones Aren't in the Air--They're in the Ocean

June 13, 2017

In July, three odd-looking, 23-foot-long sailboats will launch from a dock in Alaska's Dutch Harbor. They will meander the seas between the U.S. and Russia to track ice melt, measure the ocean's levels of carbon dioxide, and count fish, seal, and whale populations. And they'll do all this without a single human being on board.

Link: The Most Exciting Drones Aren't in the Air--They're in the Ocean

A Century-Old Arctic Shipwreck Could Help Us Predict Extreme Weather

March 28, 2017

In 1879, the USS Jeannette and her crew left San Francisco, headed for the Bering Strait with a dream: to win the race to reach the North Pole. After months of perilous sailing, the Jeannette made it through the strait. But soon after, she got stuck in the grip of ice floes, or sheets of floating ice.

Link: A Century-Old Arctic Shipwreck Could Help Us Predict Extreme Weather

Pages