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Atmospheric Administration
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In the News

The Arctic is getting hotter, greener and less icy much faster than expected, report finds

December 08, 2020

Bitterly cold, frozen and inhospitable to nearly all wildlife apart from polar bears. This is the image of the Arctic that comes to mind for many. But in a matter of decades -- a blink of an eye in the history of this planet -- human-caused global warming has transformed the Arctic into a place that scientists say is increasingly unrecognizable. Jim Overland is quoted. 

Link: The Arctic is getting hotter, greener and less icy much faster than expected, report finds

‘Godzilla’ dust storm traced to shaky northern jet stream

December 07, 2020

The new findings identify yet another way in which a warming Arctic might disturb the weather half a world away. The root cause of the extra-wavy jet stream is under fierce debate, but some scientists believe Arctic warming and declining sea ice are to blame for Godzilla’s far-reaching effects. Jim Overland is quoted. 

Link: ‘Godzilla’ dust storm traced to shaky northern jet stream

Ocean-Going Robots Poised to Enter Bering Sea to Start Unconventional Fisheries Survey

June 30, 2020

Scientists implement a contingency plan to collect valuable abundance data to support sustainable management of the largest commercial fishery in the United States.

Link: Ocean-Going Robots Poised to Enter Bering Sea to Start Unconventional Fisheries Survey

Climate conundrum: Could COVID-19 be linked to early Arctic ice melt?

June 08, 2020

Scientists are working to determine if, and by how much, sulphate aerosols have declined due to the industrial slowdown brought by the COVID-19 pandemic. Patricia Quinn is quoted about her work on aerosols. 

Link: Climate conundrum: Could COVID-19 be linked to early Arctic ice melt?

Autonomous Vehicles Help Scientists Estimate Fish Abundance While Protecting Human Health and Safety

June 01, 2020

Scientists are capitalizing on existing technological capabilities and partnerships to collect fisheries data. This will help fill the information gap resulting from the cancellation of FY20 ship-based surveys due to the COVID-19 pandemic. NOAA Fisheries plans to use autonomous surface vehicles to collect some critically needed data to support management of the nation’s largest commercial fishery for Alaska pollock. Eugene Burger, ITAE, and EDD are featured. 

Link: Autonomous Vehicles Help Scientists Estimate Fish Abundance While Protecting Human Health and Safety

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