National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
United States Department of Commerce

In the News

The Arctic is warming faster than it has in 1,500 years

December 12, 2017

The Arctic is running a fever. The magnitude and pace of the recent Arctic sea-ice decline and ocean warming is "unprecedented" in at least the past 1,500 years and likely much longer, according to a federal report released Tuesday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 

Link: The Arctic is warming faster than it has in 1,500 years

Scientists Need Your Help Rescuing 100-Year-Old Weather Records

December 07, 2017

A new citizen-science project needs volunteers to digitize decades of temperature, rain and barometric data from across western Europe

Link: Scientists Need Your Help Rescuing 100-Year-Old Weather Records

1 hour radio show highlights Alaska ocean acidification researchers and fishermen

October 30, 2017

The local radio station out of Cordova, KLAM, aired a 1-hour show on October 30, highlighting ocean acidification in Alaska, the science behind the issue, perspectives from the fishing community, and resources from the network.

Link: 1 hour radio show highlights Alaska ocean acidification researchers and fishermen

These ocean drones are trawling for climate change data

October 27, 2017

A fleet of unmanned boats is traveling from the Arctic to the equator, gathering vital data on climate change.

The autonomous vessels -- called "Saildrones" -- resemble bright red surfboards. Each is fitted with a 20-foot-high carbon fiber sail, and 16 sensors that test variables including carbon dioxide, acidity, currents and water temperature.

Link: These ocean drones are trawling for climate change data

A U.S. Collaboration Between Military and Research Science

October 18, 2017

Warming in Arctic ecosystems over the last several decades threatens animals and people alike, while melting ice has been accompanied by a dramatic increase in maritime activity. Yet study of the Arctic has been limited by its location and extreme weather conditions. New technologies and capabilities are necessary to operate in the region, and as attention to the high north grows, researchers and engineers are finding opportunities to expand their work despite uncertain funding. Tight budgets have pushed scientists to partner with institutions such as the U.S. Coast Guard in order to conduc... more

Link: A U.S. Collaboration Between Military and Research Science

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