National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
United States Department of Commerce

In the News

Vanishing Bering Sea ice threatens one of the richest U.S. seafood sources

May 15, 2019

When ice failed to cover much of the eastern Bering Sea between Alaska and Russia in early 2018, oceanographer James Overland chalked it up to a freak chance. Then, it happened again this year, with late-winter sea ice falling to some of the lowest levels seen in at least 4 decades. Drs. Jim Overland and Phyllis Stabeno are quoted. 

Link: Vanishing Bering Sea ice threatens one of the richest U.S. seafood sources

Scientists: Southeast Alaska vulnerable to ocean acidification

February 21, 2019

Southeast Alaska is poised to be among the first regions in the world affected by ocean acidification. The Alaska Ocean Acidification Network hosted a public presentation Wednesday about the phenomenon that is making ocean water more acidic, and Alaska scientists explained why Southeast is likely to be impacted more quickly than other parts of the world. Jessica Cross is quoted. 

Link: Scientists: Southeast Alaska vulnerable to ocean acidification

Wind Change Pulls Curtain Back On A Future Bering Sea

February 08, 2019

For those who wonder what the Bering Sea will be like decades from now, last year was a glimpse of the future. Join Phyllis Stabeno and Tom Van Pelt on KYUK, Alaska's Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.

Link: Wind Change Pulls Curtain Back On A Future Bering Sea

NOAA deploys a flotilla of Saildrones in the Arctic

September 06, 2018

In 2014, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) partnered with Saildrone, Inc. to test the possibilities of using unmanned sailing vehicles to collect data. From 2015 to 2017, missions including one to the Bering Sea, were used to verify the data platforms and to confirm that the sensors were working well. Each year they continued to tweak the challenge sensors adding more complex variables. Jessica Cross is quoted. 

Link: NOAA deploys a flotilla of Saildrones in the Arctic

Why a Quiet Hurricane Season Isn't Necessarily a Good Thing

August 02, 2018

Forecasters at Colorado State University say the approaching peak of the 2018 hurricane season will be relatively quiet in the Atlantic Basin. But a report released Wednesday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration pointed out a troubling trend that could have implications for future hurricane forecasting: Warming in the Arctic could drive future Atlantic hurricane tracks farther west and thus make a U.S. landfall more likely. Jim Overland is quoted. 

Link: Why a Quiet Hurricane Season Isn't Necessarily a Good Thing

Pages