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In the News

How rapid Arctic sea ice melt may alter global weather patterns

January 12, 2017

Significant melting of Arctic sea ice is linked to changing global weather patterns, but climate scientists still have a lot of unanswered questions. "The Arctic is changing fairly rapidly," NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Lab oceanographer Dr. James Overland said, citing the record low ice extent in November 2016.

Link: How rapid Arctic sea ice melt may alter global weather patterns

Beneath the waves or underground, warming Alaska poses multiple threats

January 03, 2017

When you talk to climatologists about 2016, the phrase “mind-boggling” comes up a lot. “For crying out loud, yesterday it was 36 degrees in Barrow, Alaska, in the middle of winter,” said Rick Fritsch, a climate expert for the National Weather Service in Juneau. “If that doesn’t make the point, I don’t know what does. That’s not supposed to happen, at least not in the world I used to live in.”

Link: Beneath the waves or underground, warming Alaska poses multiple threats

The Polar Vortex Is Back, and a Warmer Arctic May Be to Blame

January 03, 2017

RESIDENTS OF ANCHORAGE, Alaska, found themselves enjoying a stretch of relatively balmy weather this past December, with temperatures at times climbing above freezing. More southerly cities near the Canada-U.S. border, meanwhile, sat in the grip of a deep freeze, with some double-digit temperature drops triggering extreme cold weather alerts.

Link: The Polar Vortex Is Back, and a Warmer Arctic May Be to Blame

Grab Your Ear Muffs, the New Year’s Arriving With a Frigid Bang

December 29, 2016

A deep freeze is about to descend on North America, Europe and Asia thanks to record high temperatures across the Arctic. How’s that? “Think of it like a seesaw,” said Matt Rogers, president of Commodity Weather Group LLC in Bethesda, Maryland. If winter temperatures rise north of Alaska, that “forces an equal-opposite downward-southward push. The cold essentially has to go somewhere else.”

Link: Grab Your Ear Muffs, the New Year’s Arriving With a Frigid Bang

The Arctic is ‘behaving so bizarrely,’ and these scientists think they know why

December 23, 2016

Last month, temperatures in the high Arctic spiked dramatically, some 36 degrees Fahrenheit above normal — a move that corresponded with record low levels of Arctic sea ice during a time of year when this ice is supposed to be expanding during the freezing polar night.

Link: The Arctic is ‘behaving so bizarrely,’ and these scientists think they know why

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