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NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown sets sail to boost ocean data for weather prediction

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Celebrating collaboration

Brazil's postal service issued this stamp to celebrate 20 years of collaboration between Brazil, France and the United States on the Prediction and Research Moored Array in the Atlantic, or PIRATA. Courtesy of the Brazil Postal Service
March 12, 2018

NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown steamed out of Charleston, South Carolina, on February 16, 2018 for a multi-stage trip around the world to improve ocean data that informs United States and global weather prediction.

Ron Brown's first mission will be to investigate ocean currents in the North Atlantic Ocean that influence global climate.  From there, NOAA's ocean workhorse will journey south to the tropical Atlantic Ocean to replace four instrumented observing moorings in the Prediction and Research Moored Array in the Atlantic or PIRATA.  The PIRATA moorings are part of a larger tropical observing system of buoys that provides ocean and atmospheric data that helps the U.S. and other nations predict droughts, floods, hurricanes and other weather affecting millions of people in the Americas and Africa.

Brazil recently issued an official postage stamp with photographs of the Ron Brown and vessels from Brazil and France to celebrate 20 years of collaboration between Brazil, France and the United States on the PIRATA ocean observing system.

See full article here.