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FINAL Cruise Instructions

FOCI

NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN, MF-02-10

September 8 – September 23, 2002

Chief Scientist: Janet Duffy-Anderson

 

 

 

1.0       DRAFT CRUISE INSTRUCTIONS

 

1.1       Cruise Title Fisheries-Oceanography Coordinated Investigations (FOCI).

 

1.2       Cruise Numbers:

 

1.2.1        Cruise Number­ MF-02-10

 

1.2.2        FOCI Number5MF02

 

1.3       Cruise Dates:

 

1.3.1        Departure Depart Kodiak, Alaska, at 1500 on Sunday, September 8, 2002.

 

1.3.2        ArrivalArrive Kodiak, Alaska, at 0800 on Monday, September 23, 2002.

 

2.0       CRUISE OVERVIEW

 

2.1       Cruise ObjectivesWe will be conducting an ichthyoplankton survey in the waters contiguous to Kodiak Island, Alaska.  This work is needed to describe larval fish assemblages on the shelf and slope in late summer/early fall and to study the transport and early life history of larval forage fishes (ex: capelin).  Zooplankton data and data on physical characteristics of the water column will also be collected.

 

2.2       Applicability – These instructions, with FOCI Standard Operating Instructions for NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN, dated April 8, 2002, present complete information for this cruise.

 

2.3       Operating AreaGulf of Alaska

 

2.4       Participating Organizations

 

NOAA – Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC)

7600 Sand Point Way N.E.

Seattle, Washington 98115-0070

 

2.5       Personnel

 

2.5.1        Chief Scientist

Name

Gender

Affiliation

E-mail Address

Janet Duffy-Anderson

Female

AFSC

Janet.Duffy-Anderson@noaa.gov

(206) 526-6465

 

 

 

 

2.5.2        Participating Scientists

 

Name

Gender

Affiliation

E-mail Address

Jennifer Lanksbury

Female

AFSC

Jennifer.Lanksbury@noaa.gov

Christina Deliyanides

Female

AFSC

Christina.Deliyanides@noaa.gov

Debbie Blood

Female

AFSC

Debbie.Blood@noaa.gov

Morgan Busby

Male

AFSC

Morgan.Busby@noaa.gov

Rachael Cartwright

Female

AFSC

Rachael.Cartwright@noaa.gov

Tiffany Vance

Female

AFSC

Tiffany.Vance@noaa.gov

 

2.6       Administrative

 

2.6.1        Ship Operations

 

Marine Operations Center, Pacific

1801 Fairview Avenue East

Seattle, Washington 98102-3767

Telephone: (206) 553-4548

Fax: (206) 553-1109

 

Commander Timothy B. Wright, NOAA

Chief, Operations Division (MOP1)

Telephone: (206) 553-8705

Cellular: (206) 390-7527

E-mail: Timothy.Wright@noaa.gov

 

Larry Mordock

Deputy Chief, Operations Division (MOP1x1)

Telephone – Work: (206) 553-4764

Home: (206) 365-3567

Cellular: (206) 465-9316

E-mail: Larry.Mordock@noaa.gov

 

2.6.2        Scientific Operations

 

Dr. Phyllis J. Stabeno, PMEL                       Dr. Jeffrey Napp, AFSC

Telephone: (206) 526-6453                           Telephone: (206) 526-4148

E-mail: Phyllis.Stabeno@noaa.gov                E-mail: Jeff.Napp@noaa.gov

 

3.0       OPERATIONS

 

3.1       Data To Be CollectedA goal of the FOCI program is to identify the physical and biological factors that underlie ecosystem change and to understand how those factors interact.  One focus is the effects of perturbations at lower trophic levels.  To this end, we will collect ichthyoplankton and zooplankton data using 60-cm Bongo nets (60BON) and 20-cm Bongo nets (20BON), a Neuston net, a Multiple Opening/Closing Net and Environmental Sensing System (MOCNESS), and California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigation (CalCOFI) Vertical Egg Tow (CalVET) nets.

 

We will occupy at least one 24-hr diel station to study vertical distribution of fish larvae, specifically capelin.  We will collect data on the physical environment using the Sea-Bird Electronics SBE 19 SEACAT Profiler to relate larval assemblage structure to environmental variables (temperature, salinity).  Sea-Bird Electronics SBE 911plus Conductivity, Temperature, and Depth (CTD) casts will collect physical data as well as data on nutrients, microzooplankton, and chlorophyll at selected stations.  This cruise will provide new information on larval fish assemblages (especially forage fishes) on the shelf off Kodiak Island during the late summer and early fall.  Samples will be collected from a grid of approximately 120 stations.

 

3.1.1        Scientific Computer System (SCS) – The ship's SCS shall operate throughout the cruise, acquiring and logging data from navigation, meteorological, oceanographic, and fisheries sensors.  See FOCI Standard Operating Instructions for NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN (SOI 5.2) for specific requirements.

 

3.2       Staging PlanThe majority of the equipment necessary for the cruise was loaded onto the NOAA ship MILLER FREEMAN when the ship departed from Seattle, Washington, in April 2002.  The MOCNESS is stored on Kodiak Island over the summer will need to be loaded prior to departure for this cruise.  We request that we be allowed to set up equipment, including the MOCNESS, on Saturday, September 7, 2002, one day prior to departure.  We will use the chemistry lab, the rough lab, and the slime lab for sample and equipment preparation and request as much counter and cabinet space as possible.  We will use DataPlot for CTD and SEACAT operations.

 

3.3       De-staging Plan – We will offload the samples upon return to Kodiak on September 23, 2002.  We will offload the gear on Monday, November 18, 2002, after the ship returns to Marine Operations Center – Pacific in Seattle, Washington.

 

3.4       Cruise Plan­The cruise will depart from Kodiak, Alaska, at 1500 on Sunday, September 8, 2002, and occupy a series of approximately 120 stations.  Station positions and a chartlet of the working area are located in Sections 9.2 Tables and 9.3 Figures, respectively.

 

3.4.1        Grid Survey – During the regular grid survey, the Neuston net will be deployed first; however, we may fish more than one type of Neuston gear as part of a gear comparison study, except when the MOCNESS is to be used.  The Neuston will collect fish larvae in the surface layer.  Samples from the Neuston net gear will be preserved in 1.8% buffered Formaldehyde.

 

Following completion of the Neuston tow, a Marine Assessment Monitoring and Prediction (MARMAP) Bongo tow (SOI 3.2.2) will be conducted.  The SBE 19 SEACAT, the 20-cm Bongo (20BON) net with 0.150-mm mesh netting and the 60-cm Bongo (60BON) net with 0.333-mm mesh netting will all be mounted together for this tow.  Bongo tows will be to a depth of 200 meters, or to 10 meters off bottom, whichever is shallower.  The sample from 60BON Net 1 will be preserved in its entirety in 1.8% buffered Formaldehyde and the sample from Net 2 will be discarded.  Similarly, the sample from 20BON Net 1 will be preserved in its entirety in 1.8% buffered Formaldehyde and the sample from Net 2 will be discarded.

 

Selected grid stations have been chosen for CTD casts to collect water samples for microzooplankton, chlorophyll, and nutrient data (SOI 3.2.1).  At these stations, the CTD cast will precede the MARMAP Bongo tow.  CTD casts will be made to 200 meters or to 10 meters off bottom, whichever is shallower.

 

3.4.2        Diel Study – There will be at least one 24-hour diel station occupation.  The first 24-hour station will likely be located immediately outside of Kodiak, Alaska.  At this station, a bongo tow will be taken to determine whether the species of interest, capelin, is present in the water column.  If so, a CTD cast will be taken, and water samples will be collected.  Immediately after the CTD cast, the MOCNESS, rigged with 0.333-mm mesh, will be deployed to provide depth-discrete ichthyoplankton samples.  Eight nets will be tripped at regular intervals between 10 meters off of the bottom, or to maximum depth 100 meters, and the surface.  Samples collected from each net of the MOCNESS will be preserved in their entirety in 1.8% buffered Formaldehyde.  This procedure will be repeated at 2- or 3-hour intervals for the 24-hour period.

 

We will try to opportunistically occupy a 24-hour station on the shelf and, if there is time, re-occupy Station #1 for 24 hours at the end of the cruise.  During each of these periods CTD casts and MOCNESS samples will be collected as outlined above.  In addition, we may opportunistically fly the MOCNESS at four or five selected stations on the shelf during the survey; however, these selected stations will not be 24-hour occupations.  Instead, the MOCNESS will be deployed only once and then the regular grid survey will be resumed.  At each of these stations the CTD cast will occur first followed by the MOCNESS tow.  Afterwards, regular grid activities will follow.

 

3.4.3        Canyon Investigation – Selected stations in Barnabus and Chiniak Canyons have been chosen for CalVET tows (SOI 3.2.6).  At these stations, the CalVET tow with 0.053-mm mesh netting will follow the MARMAP Bongo tow (0.333-mm mesh).  The CalVET tows, both nets combined, will be preserved in 1.8% buffered Formaldehyde. These stations will be sampled with 60-cm and 20-cm Bongo nets and CTD casts.  These samples will supply much needed ground truth data for moorings and extend sampling in time for hydrography (CTD sections), nutrient chemistry, chlorophyll, and net tows for zooplankton and larvae of forage fish.  Objectives for this study are:

 

1)      Determine seasonal evolution of water column and frontal structure at the two study sites,

2)      Supply necessary ground truth biological and chemical data for instrumented moorings,

3)      Bracket the time that larval forage fish and other Stellar Sea Lion prey are "recruited" to the study sites,

4)      Examine forage fish prey fields on both sides of fronts,

5)      Supply detailed zooplankton prey field data for REFM forage fish food habits study, and

6)      Extend investigations of canyons as conduits for inshore transport of shelf spawning fish species.

 

3.5       Station LocationsSee Section 9.2 Tables.

 

3.6       Station Operations – The following are operations to be conducted on this cruise.  The procedures for these operations are listed in the FOCI Standard Operating Instructions for NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN (SOI).  Operations not addressed in the SOI and changes to standard procedures are addressed below.

 

·         CTD/Water Sample Operations (SOI 3.2.1),

·         MARMAP Bongo Tows (SOI 3.2.2),

·         MOCNESS Tows (SOI 3.2.5),

·         CalVET Net Tows (SOI 3.2.6),

·         Chlorophyll Samples (SOI 3.2.10), and

·         SIMRAD EK500 Scientific Echosounder Monitoring (SOI 3.2.12).

 

3.6.1        Neuston Net Tows

 

3.6.1.1  Description – Neuston nets are used for sampling the upper few centimeters of the water column.  There are many frame styles that may be used; however, we use a Sameoto sampler made of stainless steel.  The mouth opening is 30-cm x 50-cm and is designed to fish half in and half out of the water.

 

3.6.1.2  Rates/Fishing – The vessel should be moving slowly ahead, about 1.5 to 2.0 knots so that the net is fishing half in and half out of the water.  The exact speed is a learning process and may vary with sea conditions.  Lower the Neuston net to the surface and pay out 10 to 15 meters of wire.  It may be necessary to adjust the ship's speed to maintain the proper skimming action.  Start the stopwatch when the net starts to fish and tow the net for approximately 9.5 minutes (unless otherwise instructed).  After 9.5 minutes, the vessel should decrease speed so that the net can be hauled in.  Advise winch operator when time is nearly up and retrieve when ready.  Read and record flow meter revolutions, time of tow, and any comments.

 

3.6.1.3  Preservation – The Neuston sample should be preserved immediately, as specified in the FOCI Field Manual or sample collection request forms.

 

3.6.1.4  Maintenance – Check net for holes and fill flow meter with water.

 

3.7       Underway Operations – The following are underway operations to be conducted on this cruise.  The procedures for these operations are listed in the FOCI Standard Operating Instructions for NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN (SOI).  Operations not addressed in the SOI and changes to standard procedures are addressed below:

 

·         Scientific Computer System (SOI 5.2),

·         Thermosalinograph Monitoring (SOI 5.3), and

·         Fluorometer Monitoring (SOI 5.3).

 

3.8       Applicable Restrictions None

 

3.9       Small Boat Operations – None

 

 

4.0       FACILITIES

 

4.1       Equipment and Capabilities Provided by Ship

 

·         Oceanographic winch with slip rings and 3-conductor cable terminated for CTD,

·         Manual wire-angle indicator,

·         Oceanographic winch with slip rings and 3-conductor cable terminated for the SBE-19 SEACAT, for net tow operations,

·         Sea-Bird Electronics’ SBE 911plus CTD system with stand, each CTD system should include underwater CTD, weights, and pinger.  There should be one deck unit for the two systems,

·         10-liter Niskin sampling bottles for use with rosette (10 plus 4 spares),

·         AUTOSAL salinometer, for CTD field corrections,

·         Sea-Bird Electronics’ SBE-19 SEACAT system,

·         Meter block for plankton tows,

·         Wire speed indicators and readout for quarterdeck, Rowe winches,

·         For meteorological observations: 2 anemometers (one R. M. Young system interfaced to the SCS), calibrated air thermometer (wet-and dry-bulb) and a calibrated barometer and/or barograph,

·         Freezer space for storage of biological and chemical samples (both blast and storage freezers, -20 and -80),

·         SIMRAD EQ-50 and SIMRAD EK-500 echosounders,

·         Bench space in DataPlot for PCs, monitor, printer to fly MOCNESS,

·         Use of Pentium PC in DataPlot for data analysis,

·         Scientific Computer System (SCS),

·         Aft Rowe winch with single conductor cable and slip rings for MOCNESS,

·         Electrical connection between Rowe winch and DataPlot,

·         Removable stern platform in place,

·         Laboratory space with exhaust hood, sink, lab tables, and storage space,

·         Sea-water hoses and nozzles to wash nets (quarterdeck and aft deck),

·         Adequate deck lighting for night-time operations,

·         Navigational equipment including GPS and radar,

·         Safety harnesses for working on quarterdeck and fantail, and

·         Ship’s crane(s) used for loading and/or deploying.

 

4.2       Equipment and Capabilities Provided by Scientists – See Section 9.1 Equipment Inventory for weights and dimensions.

 

·         Sea-Bird Electronics’ SBE 911plus CTD system to be used with PMEL stand (primary system),

·         Sea-Bird Electronics’ SBE-19 SEACAT system (primary system),

·         PMEL PC with SEASOFT software for CTD data collection and processing,

·         Fluorometer and light meter to be mounted on CTD,

·         CTD stand modified for attachment of fluorometer,

·         Conductivity and temperature sensor package to provide dual sensors on the primary CTD,

·         CTD rosette sampler,

·         60-cm Bongo sampling arrays, 

·         20-cm Bongo arrays,

·         Spare wire angle indicator,

·         CalVET net array, 

·         MOCNESS,

·         Miscellaneous scientific sampling and processing equipment,

·         Scientific ultra-cold freezer, and

·         Cruise Operations Database (COD).

 

5.0       DISPOSITION OF DATA AND REPORTS

 

5.1       The following data products will be included in the cruise data package:

 

·         NOAA Form 77-13d – Deck Log – Weather Observation Sheets,

·         Electronic Marine Operations Abstracts,

·         SCS backup – recordable compact diskette (CD-RW),

·         Calibration Sheets for all ship's and scientific instruments used,

·         CTD VHS videocassettes,

·         CTD Cast Information/Rosette Log,

·         Autosalinometer Logs,

·         Electronic Navigation suite’s export files on diskette,

·         Ultra-cold Freezer Temperature Daily Log (SOI 5.4).

 

5.2       Pre- and Post-cruise MeetingsCruise meetings may be held in accordance with FOCI Standard Operating Instructions for NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN (SOI 5.5).

 

6.0       ADDITIONAL PROJECTS

 

6.1       Definition – Ancillary and piggyback projects are secondary to the objectives of the cruise and should be treated as additional investigations.  The difference between the two types of secondary projects is that an ancillary project does not have representation aboard and is accomplished by the ship's force.

 

6.2       Ancillary Projects – Any ancillary work done during this project will be accomplished with the concurrence of the Chief Scientist and on a not-to-interfere basis with the programs described in these instructions and in accordance with the NOAA Fleet Standing Ancillary Instructions.

 

6.3       Piggyback ProjectsNone

 

7.0       HAZARDOUS MATERIALS

 

7.1       Inventory – See Section 9.4 HAZMAT Inventory.

 

7.2       Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) – Submitted separately

 

8.0       MISCELLANEOUS

 

8.1       Communications – Specific information on how to contact the NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and all other fleet vessels can be found at:

 

http://www.moc.noaa.gov/phone.htm

 

8.2       Important Telephone and Facsimile Numbers and E-mail Addresses

 

8.2.1        Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL):

 

FOCI – Ocean Environmental Research Division (OERD2):

·         (206) 526-4700 (voice)

·         (206) 526-6485 (fax)

 

Administration:

·         (206) 526-6810 (voice)

·         (206) 526-6815 (fax)

 

E-Mail: FirstName.LastName@noaa.gov

 

8.2.2        Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC):

 

FOCI – Resource Assessment and Conservation Engineering (RACE):

·         (206) 526-4171 (voice)

·         (206) 526-6723 (fax)

 

E-Mail: FirstName.LastName@noaa.gov

 

8.2.3        NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN – Telephone methods listed in order of increasing expense:

 

Homeport – Seattle, Washington:

·         (206) 553-4589

·         (206) 553-4581

·         (206) 553-8344

 

United States Coast Guard – Kodiak, Alaska

·         (907) 487-9752

·         (907) 487-9753

·         (907) 487-4397

·         (907) 487-4398

 

Cellular:

·         (206) 660-7167

 

INMARSAT Mini-M

·         011-872-761-267-346 (voice/PBX)

·         011-872-761-267-347 (voice)

 

INMARSAT B

·         011-872-330-394-113 (voice)

·         011-872-330-394-114 (fax)

 

E-Mail: NOAA.Ship.Miller.Freeman@noaa.gov (mention the person’s name in SUBJECT field)

 

8.2.4        Marine Operations Center, Pacific (MOP):

 

Operations Division (MOP1)

·         (206) 553-4548 (voice)

·         (206) 553-1109 (facsimile)

 

E-Mail: FirstName.LastName@noaa.gov

 

E-Mail to Radio Room: Radio.Room@noaa.gov

 

9.0       APPENDICES

 

9.1       Equipment Inventory

 

Equipment

Quantity

Dimension

Weight

Larval Supply Trunks

1

20" x 22" x 36"

80-lbs

Microzooplankton Supply Trunks

2

20" x 22" x 36"

90-lbs (ea)

Formaldehyde Containers

3 x 20-Liter

 

40-lbs (ea)

Carboy, 95% Reagent Alcohol

1 x 20-Liter

 

40-lbs

Miscellaneous Gear Trunks

4

20" x 22" x 36"

80-lbs (ea)

60-cm Bongo Frame

1

8" x 26" x 60"

 

20-cm Bongo Frame

1

8" x 14" x 16"

 

MOCNESS Frame

1

90” x 90”

250 lbs

CalVET Frame

1

24" x 18" x 18"

5-lbs

Cases, Glass Jars, 32-oz

30 cases

8" x 12" x 15"

50-lbs

Cases, Glass Jars, 8-oz

10 cases

4" x 6" x 8"

8-lbs

 

 

9.2       Tables

 

Station

Operation

 

Latitude

 

 

Longitude

 

DecLat

DecLong

 

Depart Kodiak, AK

57°

43.602'

N

152°

31.062'

W

57.727

-152.518

1

Bay - 24 hr station

57°

38.760'

N

152°

21.720'

W

57.646

-152.362

2

GRID

57°

47.400'

N

152°

02.700'

W

57.790

-152.045

3

GRID

57°

55.902'

N

151°

42.798'

W

57.932

-151.713

4

GRID

58°

03.300'

N

151°

25.098'

W

58.055

-151.418

5

GRID

58°

11.202'

N

151°

06.198'

W

58.187

-151.103

6

GRID

58°

22.200'

N

151°

22.500'

W

58.370

-151.375

7

GRID

58°

31.698'

N

151°

36.300'

W

58.528

-151.605

8

GRID

58°

42.900'

N

151°

53.100'

W

58.715

-151.885

9

GRID

58°

50.502'

N

151°

34.200'

W

58.842

-151.570

10

GRID

58°

58.098'

N

151°

15.300'

W

58.968

-151.255

11

GRID

58°

48.300'

N

150°

59.502'

W

58.805

-150.992

12

GRID

58°

40.200'

N

151°

17.598'

W

58.670

-151.293

13

GRID

58°

29.502'

N

151°

02.802'

W

58.492

-151.047

14

GRID

58°

38.700'

N

150°

44.502'

W

58.645

-150.742

15

GRID

58°

28.002'

N

150°

27.900'

W

58.467

-150.465

16

GRID

58°

17.700'

N

150°

11.598'

W

58.295

-150.193

17

GRID

58°

08.202'

N

149°

56.898'

W

58.137

-149.948

18

GRID

57°

57.702'

N

149°

40.800'

W

57.962

-149.680

19

GRID

57°

47.700'

N

149°

25.602'

W

57.795

-149.427

20

GRID

57°

39.798'

N

149°

45.498'

W

57.663

-149.758

21

GRID

57°

49.902'

N

150°

00.300'

W

57.832

-150.005

22

GRID

57°

59.502'

N

150°

16.398'

W

57.992

-150.273

23

GRID

58°

09.798'

N

150°

32.400'

W

58.163

-150.540

24

GRID

58°

19.998'

N

150°

45.702'

W

58.333

-150.762

25

GRID

58°

01.800'

N

150°

52.098'

W

58.030

-150.868

26

GRID

57°

51.498'

N

150°

36.000'

W

57.858

-150.600

27

GRID

57°

42.102'

N

150°

19.698'

W

57.702

-150.328

28

GRID

57°

31.902'

N

150°

04.698'

W

57.532

-150.078

29

GRID

57°

22.902'

N

150°

23.502'

W

57.382

-150.392

30

GRID

57°

33.000'

N

150°

39.702'

W

57.550

-150.662

31

GRID

57°

43.302'

N

150°

54.498'

W

57.722

-150.908

32

GRID

57°

53.202'

N

151°

09.600'

W

57.887

-151.160

33

GRID

57°

45.552'

N

151°

28.152'

W

57.759

-151.469

34

GRID

57°

35.202'

N

151°

13.500'

W

57.587

-151.225

35

GRID

57°

24.798'

N

150°

58.302'

W

57.413

-150.972

36

GRID

57°

14.598'

N

150°

43.098'

W

57.243

-150.718

37

GRID

57°

04.002'

N

150°

26.700'

W

57.067

-150.445

38

GRID

56°

55.002'

N

150°

12.102'

W

56.917

-150.202

39

GRID

56°

56.400'

N

150°

46.698'

W

56.940

-150.778

40

GRID

57°

06.198'

N

151°

02.202'

W

57.103

-151.037

41

GRID

57°

17.598'

N

151°

17.400'

W

57.293

-151.290

42

CBA5

57°

28.002'

N

151°

13.002'

W

57.467

-151.217

43

CBA4

57°

25.998'

N

151°

17.250'

W

57.433

-151.288

44

CBA3

57°

24.000'

N

151°

21.498'

W

57.400

-151.358

45

CBA2

57°

22.002'

N

151°

25.752'

W

57.367

-151.429

46

CBA1

57°

19.998'

N

151°

30.000'

W

57.333

-151.500

47

CBB1

57°

25.902'

N

151°

39.000'

W

57.432

-151.650

48

GRID

57°

26.598'

N

151°

32.700'

W

57.443

-151.545

49

CBB2

57°

27.600'

N

151°

34.500'

W

57.460

-151.575

50

CBB3

57°

29.298'

N

151°

30.498'

W

57.488

-151.508

51

CBB4

57°

31.002'

N

151°

26.502'

W

57.517

-151.442

52

CBB5

57°

34.002'

N

151°

22.002'

W

57.567

-151.367

53

GRID

57°

37.698'

N

151°

47.700'

W

57.628

-151.795

54

GRID

56°

28.902'

N

153°

45.402'

W

56.482

-153.757

55

ABA5

57°

19.998'

N

151°

46.998'

W

57.333

-151.783

56

GRID

57°

18.198'

N

151°

51.702'

W

57.303

-151.862

57

ABA4

57°

17.502'

N

151°

52.752'

W

57.292

-151.879

58

ABA3

57°

15.000'

N

151°

58.500'

W

57.250

-151.975

59

ABA2

57°

12.498'

N

152°

04.248'

W

57.208

-152.071

60

GRID

57°

10.602'

N

152°

09.102'

W

57.177

-152.152

61

ABA1

57°

10.002'

N

152°

10.002'

W

57.167

-152.167

62

ABB1

57°

03.498'

N

152°

04.248'

W

57.058

-152.071

63

ABB2

57°

06.000'

N

151°

58.500'

W

57.100

-151.975

64

ABB3

57°

08.502'

N

151°

52.752'

W

57.142

-151.879

65

ABB4

57°

10.998'

N

151°

46.998'

W

57.183

-151.783

66

ABB5

57°

13.500'

N

151°

42.498'

W

57.225

-151.708

67

GRID

57°

08.400'

N

151°

35.598'

W

57.140

-151.593

68

GRID

56°

58.002'

N

151°

20.400'

W

56.967

-151.340

69

GRID

56°

48.198'

N

151°

06.102'

W

56.803

-151.102

70

GRID

56°

40.398'

N

151°

25.200'

W

56.673

-151.420

71

GRID

56°

49.602'

N

151°

40.698'

W

56.827

-151.678

72

GRID

57°

00.102'

N

151°

53.898'

W

57.002

-151.898

73

GRID

57°

19.500'

N

152°

23.898'

W

57.325

-152.398

74

GRID

57°

12.198'

N

152°

44.898'

W

57.203

-152.748

75

GRID

57°

01.902'

N

152°

29.298'

W

57.032

-152.488

76

BCB1

56°

58.998'

N

152°

27.498'

W

56.983

-152.458

77

BCB2

56°

58.170'

N

152°

31.500'

W

56.970

-152.525

78

BCB3

56°

57.336'

N

152°

35.502'

W

56.956

-152.592

79

BCB4

56°

56.502'

N

152°

39.498'

W

56.942

-152.658

80

BCA4

56°

49.020'

N

152°

36.228'

W

56.817

-152.604

81

BCA3

56°

50.730'

N

152°

32.190'

W

56.846

-152.537

82

BCA2

56°

52.446'

N

152°

28.158'

W

56.874

-152.469

83

BCA1

56°

54.162'

N

152°

24.120'

W

56.903

-152.402

84

GRID

56°

51.900'

N

152°

14.298'

W

56.865

-152.238

85

GRID

56°

41.802'

N

151°

58.998'

W

56.697

-151.983

86

GRID

56°

31.998'

N

151°

45.402'

W

56.533

-151.757

87

GRID

56°

23.598'

N

152°

03.798'

W

56.393

-152.063

88

GRID

56°

33.900'

N

152°

18.702'

W

56.565

-152.312

89

GRID

56°

44.100'

N

152°

34.500'

W

56.735

-152.575

90

GRID

56°

54.000'

N

152°

48.402'

W

56.900

-152.807

91

GRID

57°

03.702'

N

153°

03.900'

W

57.062

-153.065

92

GRID

56°

55.800'

N

153°

22.302'

W

56.930

-153.372

93

GRID

56°

45.600'

N

153°

13.302'

W

56.760

-153.222

94

GRID

56°

35.502'

N

152°

52.500'

W

56.592

-152.875

95

GRID

56°

25.902'

N

152°

37.602'

W

56.432

-152.627

96

GRID

56°

15.498'

N

152°

22.902'

W

56.258

-152.382

97

GRID

56°

04.602'

N

152°

07.698'

W

56.077

-152.128

98

GRID

56°

17.400'

N

152°

55.998'

W

56.290

-152.933

99

GRID

56°

26.400'

N

153°

11.502'

W

56.440

-153.192

100

GRID

56°

38.202'

N

153°

27.300'

W

56.637

-153.455

101

GRID

56°

47.700'

N

153°

41.100'

W

56.795

-153.685

102

GRID

56°

38.598'

N

153°

53.502'

W

56.643

-153.892

103

GRID

56°

28.902'

N

153°

45.402'

W

56.482

-153.757

104

GRID

56°

18.798'

N

153°

29.898'

W

56.313

-153.498

105

GRID

56°

09.798'

N

153°

15.000'

W

56.163

-153.250

106

GRID

56°

00.000'

N

153°

32.298'

W

56.000

-153.538

107

GRID

55°

52.602'

N

153°

51.498'

W

55.877

-153.858

108

GRID

56°

01.998'

N

154°

08.400'

W

56.033

-154.140

109

GRID

56°

10.200'

N

153°

48.300'

W

56.170

-153.805

110

GRID

56°

20.598'

N

154°

03.000'

W

56.343

-154.050

111

GRID

56°

12.798'

N

154°

21.600'

W

56.213

-154.360

112

GRID

56°

23.052'

N

154°

36.402'

W

56.384

-154.607

 

WAYPOINT

56°

22.500'

N

154°

54.000'

W

56.375

-154.900

113

GRID

56°

33.300'

N

154°

51.198'

W

56.555

-154.853

114

GRID

56°

43.398'

N

155°

06.798'

W

56.723

-155.113

115

GRID

56°

53.100'

N

155°

21.402'

W

56.885

-155.357

116

GRID

57°

01.302'

N

155°

03.102'

W

57.022

-155.052

117

GRID

56°

51.798'

N

154°

47.400'

W

56.863

-154.790

118

GRID

56°

41.898'

N

154°

33.198'

W

56.698

-154.553

119

GRID

56°

40.350'

N

154°

21.876'

W

56.673

-154.365

120

GRID

56°

47.604'

N

154°

09.318'

W

56.793

-154.155

121

GRID

56°

54.492'

N

154°

22.194'

W

56.908

-154.370

122

GRID

57°

01.380'

N

154°

35.106'

W

57.023

-154.585

123

GRID

57°

08.268'

N

154°

48.048'

W

57.138

-154.801

1

Bay - 24 hr station

57°

38.760'

N

152°

21.720'

W

57.646

-152.362

 

Arrive Kodiak, AK

57°

43.602'

N

152°

31.062'

W

57.727

-152.518

 

 

9.3       Figures

 

 

 

 


9.4       HAZMAT Inventory

 

 

Chemical

CAS Number

Respondee

Organization

Quantity

H

F

R

C

Hazard Class

Packing Group Number

UN

Reportable Quantity

Response Indices

Alcohol, Reagent, 95%

mix

Duffy-Anderson

AFSC

1 x 20-l

3

3

1

3

3

II

1987

350 Lb

1

Formaldehyde, 37%

mix

Duffy-Anderson

AFSC

3 x 20-l

3

2

2

3

3 & 8

III

1198

100 Lb

2

Sodium Borate

1330-43-4

Duffy-Anderson

AFSC

500 g

2

0

0

1

Not regulated

 

 

None

3

Sodium Borate Solution, Saturated

mix

Duffy-Anderson

AFSC

1 x 20-l

2

0

0

1

Not regulated

 

 

None

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spill Response 1: Ventilate area of leak or spill.  Wear appropriate personal protective equipment.  Isolate hazard area.  Keep unnecessary and unprotected personnel from entering.  Contain and recover liquid when possible.  Neutralize with alkaline material (soda ash, lime), then absorb with an inert material (e. g., vermiculite, dry sand, earth), and place in a chemical waste container.  Do not use combustible materials, such as saw dust.  Do not flush to sewer!  U.S. Regulations (CERCLA) requires reporting spills and releases to soil, water and air in excess of reportable quantities.  The toll free number for the U.S. Coast Guard National Response Center is (800) 424-8802.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spill Response 2: Ventilate area of leak or spill.  Remove all sources of ignition.  Wear appropriate personal protective equipment.  Isolate hazard area.  Keep unnecessary and unprotected personnel from entering.  Contain and recover liquid when possible.  Use non-sparking tools and equipment.  Collect liquid in an appropriate container or absorb with an inert material (e. g., vermiculite, dry sand, or earth), and place in a chemical waste container.  Do not use combustible materials, such as saw dust.  Do not flush to sewer!  If a leak or spill has not ignited, use water spray to disperse the vapors, to protect personnel attempting to stop leak, and to flush spills away from exposures.  U.S. Regulations (CERCLA) requires reporting spills and releases to soil, water and air in excess of reportable quantities.  The toll free number for the U.S. Coast Guard National Response Center is (800) 424-8802.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spill Response 3: Ventilate area of leak or spill.  Wear appropriate personal protective equipment.  Pick up and place in a suitable container for reclamation or disposal, using a method that does not generate dust.

 

 

Fisheries-Oceanography Coordinated Investigations

NOAA | Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory | Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Seattle, WA 98115
FOCI Coordinator
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